Don’t Forget to Notify These People When You Move

You’ve finally found it—your dream home.  The closing date is set and you’re in a flurry of consolidating and sorting your belongings so the move will be as quick and painless as possible.  If you’re really organized, you’ve probably drawn up a list of tasks that need to be completed in advance; however, amidst the chaos, it’s important to remember that notifying people and institutions of your move is just as important as packing your things.

Plain and simple, making sure your bills get to your new address is your responsibility and at the end of the day, no one wants to deal with missing mail or missed payments.  Therefore, before your move, it’s important to keep a list of companies and people who will need to be kept abreast of your plans.

YOUR EMPLOYER

Unless you’re simply moving to a new home in the same area, if you’re planning on leaving your job, it’s important to let your current employer know as soon as possible.  Obviously a large part of this is simple common courtesy, but the other aspect deals with the fact that they will need your new address so that things like insurance information or tax documents can reach you in a timely manner.

LANDLORD

If you’re currently renting, most rental agreements contain information regarding the amount of notice you are expected to give before terminating your lease.  Most individual landlords or management companies will require a written notice at least 30 days in advance.

UTILITIES

You certainly don’t want to get hit with a past-due penalty simply because you forgot to disconnect your services and you don’t want to arrive at your new residence, only to find that your home is sans light or AC/heat.  Make a point to contact your utility companies and arrange for services to either be turned-on or turned-off on the day of your move.

FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS

Keeping your finances in order is important, especially if you want your bills to go to the right place.  Make a point to inform your bank, as well as any agencies handling things like your life, health, or homeowners insurance policies, and contact any credit card or lending institutions with whom you may be doing business.

POST OFFICE

For the most part, this one is a no-brainer.  Changing your address is obviously extremely important; however, make sure it’s on your list anyway—just in case.  The process is relatively easy and can be done at your local branch or through the USPS website.

DMV

If you’re moving to another part of the country, most states only give anywhere between 10 to 30 days to transfer your driver’s license and update your vehicle registration and insurance.  If you’re unsure of what needs to be done, consider visiting the DMV website for the state your leaving, as well as the one you’re moving to, to get the specifics.  If you can put the paperwork in motion in advance, it will simply save you time down the road.

THE GOVERNMENT

While this often gets done when you change your address through the U.S. Post Office, it’s important to make sure that your new address is reflected within government agencies such as the Social Security Administration and the IRS.  Both institutions have change of address forms on their website, so it’s important to fill these out as soon as possible.

TRANSFER MEDICAL/EDUCATION RECORDS

If you’re moving to a new location where your children will be enrolled in a different school system and seeing a new pediatrician, you may want to have your records transferred in advance (this goes for your medical records as well).

SUBSCRIPTION SERVICES

If you have a certain magazine or newspaper coming to your home on a regular basis, you’ll want to update your address so you keep receiving them.

In the end, most companies try to make changing your address as simple as possible.  Whether they offer a change of address form on their website or require a simple phone call, this process shouldn’t take too much time.  The important part is simply tackling it in advance instead of waiting until bills are missing or you’re hit with late fees.  Cleaning up a mess after the fact will make things much more difficult.

If you have any questions or would like additional advice on how to make the selling or moving process easier, I’d love to hear from you.

Pam Evans | Hello Pam Evans Real Estate | www.HelloPamEvans.com | 678-778-6551

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